Posted by: A. C. Cockerill | July 23, 2011

Favorite Tip #2: Computer-Free Day

Favorite Tip #2:

Take a computer-free day once a week to help reduce stress and eye strain. No cellphones. No e-readers. No computers. No TV. Disconnecting for a day is tough, but worth it.

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Responses

  1. LOL I try this with good intentions at the start of the day, but by the end of the day it’s a big fail!

    • Hi Shelley, The secret is to power down all the devices, except for the cellphone. It needs to stay on for emergency-calls-only. Sunday is a great day for computer-free-days. It took a few weeks, but now I love computer-free-day. It’s a chance to hit the “reset” button. And playtime is essential in the 21st century. Cheers, Ashley

  2. This is actually a good idea. Wonder if I can pull it off?

    • Hi Beth, Absolutely! Powering down devices gets easier within a few weeks–noticed the productivity on the other six days went way up. Therefore, no guilt! Cheers, Ashley

  3. By the way, Sundays are my computer-free-days. Cheers, Ashley

  4. Sounds nice in theory…. but once a month would be pushing it for me. I’m a programmer in my day job – which means weekends are my main writing time. Once in a while I can do this if I’m working on a revision, on a printout. However, I do leave the tech at home when I go on vacation!

    • Hi Jennette, How about one or two computer-free-evenings per week? Cheers, Ashley

  5. I’m president of my chapter so it’s not easy for me to not be on the computer at least once a day. Maybe next year when I’m not in the postion any more. I know my husband would llike it. : )

    • Hi Donna, Chapter president. Wow, that’ll keep you busy. Would one to two computer-free-evenings a week help? Also, some people like to start their days at sunset and continue 24 hours to the next sunset–another option. Cheers Ashley

  6. Great idea! But then there’s all that catching up to do.

    • So true, Marilyn. On average, it seems to take about 20-30 minutes to file 400 no-need-to-read e-mails. An average 30 need-to-read-and-answer e-mails seem to take an additional 30-50 minutes. Cheers.

  7. I am forced to take whole days sometimes (like twice this week I went to the Kenai River to dipnet salmon, which left zero time for electronic devices.) But I find I sometimes have a hard time getting back “into” my work when I am away, even for a day.

    • Hi Tam, Dipnetting salmon in the Kenai River sounds wonderfully cool, especially to those of us living in triple-digit-degree Texas. Cheers, Ashley

  8. Hi Ashley!

    Now that I’m writing full-time in addition to my day job, I’m on the computer a lot. But I gave up 90% of my tv time, so does that make it even out??

    Occasionally I find that I have to take a day off, just because I feel too dizzy to use the computer any longer. I guess that’s my body’s way of saying it’s time to take a break.

    I’ll try to do one-day free throughout the summer, but there’s no way I’ll be able to do that come autumn. Unless I just limit it to checking emails on a certain day and handwrite my wip that day.

    Hmmm. Food for thought.

    • Hi Jolyse, Have you talked to your doctor about the dizziness? I started taking computer-free-days to battle a mean case of eye strain–not nearly as serious as dizziness. It never hurts to check and make sure all is well. Cheers, Ashley


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